Category Archives: money-saving

Review of Joan’s Elder Care Guide published by 4RV Publishing

thumbnail_Joan Y. Edwards smaller web AE9Z7443 I just finished reading my friend Joan Edward’s excellent book on elder care. Joan lovingly cared for her mother for many years and the book reads as if it is a friend telling you how to get through this difficult time of helping our parents in their last days.

I consider myself in the “sandwich generation” at this time of my life. I need to help my parents more and more, yet I am also needed to babysit for my grandson and his soon to be born little brother. Joan’s book is an excellent guide to help us.

She really did her homework in researching all that is needed in caring for the elderly. There are over 170 footnotes in the book. After telling us about her care-giving experience, she helps the reader to explore whether they can indeed be the one to care for their loved one by asking many pertinent questions.

Step by step, Joan covers every needed base, including chapters on gathering important papers, making a “care-giver tool kit,” dealing with insurance, types of assisted living facilities, how to deal with your elder’s doctors and what to ask if they have to undergo a procedure of some type. She gives advice even on how to work with the billing department when a medical procedure’s cost is sky high.

One piece of great advice I found on page 88. When you have taken your elder out on the road for more than 2 hours you should provide them with water and a snack before trying to get them out of the car upon your return home. That is something perhaps I would have forgotten during the stress of a road trip with Mom.

Joan has done the hard part: pulling together all the needed information someone would need when taking on the difficult job of care-giving. Included in the back are checklists so one can evaluate what specific needs their elder has, and what they are still able to do for themselves. Also are charts to list where important information is located, a 12 week walking log, and a chart to keep track of bills that need paid, among others. She gives great advice on conflict resolution, and most importantly she tells her readers that they must take care of themselves first in order to be able to care for their loved one.

As a non-fiction writer myself, I can really appreciate the time and effort Joan took to provide such a thorough guide for care-givers. Providing her list of references for each footnote itself is a treasure trove of information.You will also find plenty of websites listed throughout for enhanced learning.

I am happy that I have this book on hand. It is available both in hardback and paperback.  I know it will truly be like having a friend to help me as I care for my Mom and Dad. I am sure that Joan’s warmth and caring reflected through Joan’s Elder Care Guide will help many others also.

Publishing information:

People can email Joan at joanyedwards1@gmail.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under care-giving, family relationships, grandmothers, honoring your parents, money-saving, parenting, Uncategorized

An Oldie but a Goodie- More with Less Cookbook by Doris Janzen Longacre

100_0047If I could tell of one cookbook I leaned on more than any other during the years when I was raising my family, it was this simple cookbook, published by a Mennonite woman back in 1976. This simple spiral bound cookbook was a great friend to me as I searched for nutritious, and compassionate recipes thoughtful of others in third world countries. Mennonite women sent the recipes to the author.
Doris told of how Americans use so much sugar. She gave the statistic that Americans ate 120 lbs. of sugar and refined sweeteners yearly. And this was nearly forty years ago! I wonder how much more it is now. She made me think about poorer countries. Doris suggested having one meal weekly as a “meager meal” so that we who had plenty would be mindful of those who did not. (A meal like beans and rice would qualify as a meager meal.) This also helps children to learn that not everyone in this world goes to bed with a full belly each night, so it is a great teaching tool.
My kids loved the recipes, and some have become family traditions: Honey Baked Lentils (on page 106), Vietnam Fried Rice (p. 130), Basic Corn Bread (p. 78) and Tangy Tuna Mac (p. 123). In the recipes, Doris was mindful not to overdo it on meat or sugar.
At the end of each chapter of recipes, she featured a “Gather Up the Fragments” section which told of handy ways to use up leftovers, so that excess food would not go to waste. Also there are handy recipes for home-made granolas, soap, play paste for children, all kinds of handy little information for saving money and being frugal.
You can probably guess that my copy is pretty tattered by now, and it has a little love note from my daughter on one of the recipe pages. When I was a young bride, another young bride who happened to be a classmate of mine at nursing school, told me how much she loved this wonderful recipe book. So, even though it is old, I am sharing it now with you. If you read this book with its handy info, you will save money and hopefully restore a sense of serenity to our crazy, overburdened lives.
One last disclaimer: Doris gives recipes for soy and talks about it being a good protein replacement. However, there is some controversy with soy, estrogen and breast cancer, so do your own research on that.

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Filed under awareness of the poor, Bible, cookbooks, homeschooling, money-saving, parenting, simplicity, Uncategorized